My Favorite High School Skit: Ikemefuna Writes to Maalaala Mo Kaya

Spoiler alert! For those who haven’t read Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe, there are some spoilers in this entry.

When I was in high school, I loved doing skits, and I also loved watching my classmates’ skits. Nothing is as charming, as hilarious, as bangag as a high school skit. Kids with little regard for a coherent or even sensible story invent these skits, but they do it with so much understanding of what their audience will love. I have spent many hours in high school laughing at my classmates creative, “horrible,” funny skits, and I still remember some of them up until this day.

My favorite high school skit was one that my classmates made for English class. We were reading a book called Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe. My classmates put on a Maalaala-Mo-Kaya-inspired skit. My classmate Ica played Charo Santos. She even had a fake mole and everything.

Since Things Fall Apart was set in Africa, she had this really fake African accent that was just hilarious. The skit started with Ica saying that their letter sender is a guy named Ikemefuna, the main character in the novel. Just like the tv show that they were imitating, the skit had scenes where Ica was reading Ikemefuna’s letter, then her groupmates would act out the scene.

When it came to the point where Ikemefuna was shot, Donna (my classmate who was playing Ikemefuna) dramatically says “Father, they have killed me.”

Then, Ica says “Did you hear that? He said ‘Father, they have killed me,’ and now I just realized that our letter sender is dead!”

More High School and Grade School Fun:

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Note: For some entries in this blog, a few names and details have been deliberately and willingly changed by the author. This is a personal decision made by the author for specific reasons known to her and is not an endorsement for censorship.

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